POST KOREAN WAR IV

 

 

AUG 1953 YOKOSUKA, OCT 1953 HONG KONG, FEB 1954 OKINAWA, IWO JIMA, LONG BEACH
CAVALIER returned to Yokosuka on 31 August 1953 and after a visit  to Hong Kong (6-20 October), operated from the ports of  Yokosuka  and  Yokohama  until  February  1954,  engaged  in  a  series  of  amphibious landing exercises off Otaru, Japan, with troops of the  lst Calvary Division as well as Marines.  Departing Yokosuka on 3  February  1954, she engaged in Fleet Marine amphibious  exercises  off  Kinmu Beach, Okinawa (6-10 February), returning to  Yokosuka  on  14 February 1954.  She again departed on 13 March  and  after  sailing   via  Nagoya,  Japan,  took  part  in  Marine   Division  Amphibious Fleet exercises off Iwo Jima, and returned to Yokosuka  on 31 March 1954.  She departed for the United States on 4  April  and arrived at Long Beach, California, 23 April 1954.


APR 1954 OPERATION RAINBOW

From  23  April  1954  to 11  January  1956,  CAVALIER  conducted  operations  along  the coast of California while  based  at  Long  Beach, California.  During this duty, on 15 July 1954, Captain W.  S. Post, USN, was relieved by Captain D. A. Harris, USN, and on 1 October  1954, with the disestablishment of  Transport  Division  15, CAVALIER became flagship of Commander Amphibious Squadron  7.  As  Squadron  Flagship,  she  took a  major  role  in  "Operation  Rainbow",  from 3 to 9 January 1955, for training the  Amphibious  and  Mine Forces concentrated in Long Beach.  This operation  was  unique in that its important collateral objective was to increase  the  knowledge  of  the general public as to  the  functions  and
operations   of   the   Amphibious  and   Mine   Forces   through  demonstrations,  displays and Navy sponsored activities.  

 

JAN 1955 – JULY 1955 MARE ISLAND

On  10  January 1955, she sailed for the Mare island Naval Shipyard where  she  underwent  conversion to a Squadron  size  flagship  through  enlargement   of  her  communication  and  flag   spaces.    Upon  completion of these alterations, on 23 March 1955 she steamed  to  resume operations out of Long Beach, California, until 11 January  1956,  when  she  departed as flagship  of  Commander  Amphibious  Squadron 7 for another tour of the Far East.  During this period,  on 17 July 1955, Captain F. M. Parker, USN, relieved Captain  D.  A. Harris, USN. 


FEB 1956 – SEP 1956 YOKOSUKA

On  3  February 1956, CAVALIER arrived at Yokosuka,  Japan.   She  sailed 11 February to take part in amphibious assault and landing  exercises  off  Iwo Jima, returning to Yokosuka  on  23  February  1956.   She  remained  based at Yokosuka  until  September  1956,  taking  part  in  two more amphibious operations  off  Iwo  Jima,  intervened  by  two visits to Hong Kong and brief  calls  to  the  principal  ports  of  Japan.  On 9 August  1956,  Captain  L.  E.  Strickler  took  command and relieved Captain F.M.  Parker,  USN.   CAVALIER  departed Yokosuka on 13 September and returned to  Long  Beach,  California, on 4 October 1956.  Based at Long Beach,  she  took part in landing exercises with troops of the 5th Marines  in
December 1956.


JAN 1957 SKI JUMP

In  January of 1957, the CAVALIER participated in Operation  "Ski  Jump".   The  air-ground  amphibious exercise was  held  off  the  southern coast of California near Camp Pendleton. 


APR 1957 OVERHAUL

In  April  of 1957, the CAVALIER entered the  Mare  Island  Naval  Shipyard  at Vallejo, California.  There she received a  complete  overhaul of all engines, machinery and other equipment on  board.   In  addition, a great deal of emphasis was placed  on  renovating  the crew's living quarters and messing facilities.
Shortly after departure from Mare Island, the CAVALIER steamed to San  Diego,  where  she entered a four-week  refresher-training  program.  Drills and exercises such as refueling and replenishing  at  sea, drone firing, damage control  procedures,  communication  and  navigational  problems were conducted.  Upon  completion  of  training, the CAVALIER completed a two-week amphibious  refresher-training   program.   On  14  September  1957,   Captain   George  Hutchinson,  USN,  relieved  Captain L.  E.  Strickler,  USN,  as  commanding  officer.   During the later part of 1957  a  rigorous  training  and  preparation program was adopted in  an  effort  to  ready the crew for deployment to the Western Pacific.


During  1957, the CAVALIER conducted two dependents cruises.   An  estimated  700  dependents were given a first hand  view  of  the  CAVALIER  and  her crew.  In addition, the CAVALIER was  host  to  over 1,000 civilians, including social organizations, Girl  Scout  and  Sea  Scout troops.  An overhaul period at Mare  island  form  April to June prepared the ship for an administration  inspection  and refresher training in San Diego in June and July.

 
FEB 1958 -  WESTPAC, “STRONGBACK”, “HAPPY LION”, “SANDY BEACH”, TYPHOON OF MAJOR SIZE

In  February  1958,  the CAVALIER left Long  Beach  for  WestPac.   After picking up troops in Okinawa, she joined with approximately  170   U.S.,  Japanese  and  Philippine  vessels   for   Operation  "STRONGBACK"  at Dingalan Bay, Luzon, Philippines.  The  CAVALIER  also  took  part in "HAPPY LION", a joint  Korean-U.S.  operation  witnessed  by  Syngman Rhee, president of the Republic  of  Korea;  and "SANDY BEACH" where she qualified for the Assault Boat Award.  She returned to the states in June 1958. (Note 2; “It was sometime during this cruise that the CAVALIER steamed through a violent storm in the South China Sea.  The listing was more than 40+ degrees and effectively removed one complete boat and davit from the starboard side.  Likely it was while returning to Yokusoka from the “HAPPY LION” exercise.”)


OCT 1958 – “ROCKY SHOALS”

Captain  R. P.  Nicholson, USN, took command of the  CAVALIER  in  October  of 1958.  In November, she took part in "ROCKY  SHOALS",  San operation off the California coast at San Simon.  The CAVALIER  picked up troops from Fort Lewis, Washington for the operation.


FEB 1959 – WESTPAC, “SEA TURTLE” – JUN 1959 LONG BEACH

On  10 February 1959, the CAVALIER departed for WestPac  stopping  enroute at Pearl Harbor (18-19 February).  During this four-month  cruise  she  participated in "SEA TURTLE",  a  joint  U.S.-Korean  operation  and  also conducted a dependents cruise to  Hong  Kong  from  Manila, Philippine Island for 300 dependents.   During  the  week  of 21 - 27 March 1959, dependents went on a shopping  spree  and  their "goods" were loaded in the holes of the  CAVALIER  and  returned  to  Manila, P.I. on 30 March 1959.   Returning  to  the  states, the CAVALIER stopped at Pearl Harbor on 3 June 1959 for 2
days and left on 5 June to arrive Long Beach on 13 June 1959.


JAN 1960 REFRESHER TRAINING AT SAN DIEGO, WESTPAC, “BLUE STAR”, “SEAHAWK”, “WETNET”, KOREA

Captain Warren C. Boles, USN, took command of the CAVALIER on  23  January 1960, during refresher training at San Diego, California.   Following refresher training the CAVALIER departed for WestPac on
16  February  for a five month cruise.  During this  cruise,  she  participated  in two amphibious operations. "BLUE STAR", a  joint  U.S.-Nationalist  Chinese  operation at Taiwan, was  the  largest  peacetime operation ever conducted outside CONUS.  "SEAHAWK" took  place  at Pohang, South Korea.  This operation afforded  CAVALIER
the  opportunity to qualify for the Amphibious Assault Award  for  the  third  consecutive  year.  Also  in  South  Korea,  CAVALIER  provided   "WETNET"  training  and  a  tour  of  the   ship   for  approximately 6000 South Korean Marines.

CAVALIER's WestPac deployment also included a dependent's  cruise  from Sasebo, Japan, to Hong Kong, China, after which she returned  to  the U.S., arriving on 25 July 1960.  In gunnery exercises  in  WestPac and EastPac, the CAVALIER obtained qualifying scores  for  the White "E" (Gunnery) on three mounts.  The year 1960 was  also  the  third consecutive year for CAVALIER to achieve the  Red  "E"  (Engineering).


OCT 1960 “MOUNT OUT”

Following  a  leave period, the CAVALIER participated  in  ship's  exercises  before participating in Operation "MOUNT OUT" at  Camp  Pendleton, California, in October.  The CAVALIER spent the  month  of  December  at Todd Shipyard in San Pedro, California.   On  27  December 1960, Captain Gerald L. Cameron, USN, assumed command of  the CAVALIER.

FEB 1961 – NEW HOME PORT SAN DIEGO

During  February  1961,  the CAVALIER switched  homeports  with  another  ship of her class, the USS BAYFIELD.  The CAVALIER  left  Long  Beach, California and arrived in her new homeport  of  San  Diego  on 11 February, joining the forces of Amphibious  Squadron  THREE.  In May she played a major role in Operation "GREENLIGHT",  a  large combined amphibious operation off Camp  Pendleton.   The  CAVALIER had the distinction of flying the Force Commander's Flag  of Vice Admiral H. A. Yeager, who witnessed the entire  operation  from the ship.


JUN 1961 –WESTPAC, “WARMUP”,  SEP 1961 -  TYPHOON NANCY

On  19 June 1961, the CAVALIER again departed her homeport  for  @WestPac,  stopping  at Pearl Harbor enroute.   During  this  six  month tour she made many trips to Japan and Okinawa, visited Hong  Kong, and delivered several tons of Operation handclasp goods  to  the people of Taiwan. The CAVALIER also participated in operation "WARMUP"  at  Okinawa.  It was off the coast of  Japan  that  the  CAVALIER  tangled with Typhoon NANCY with her 160 MPH  winds  and  mountainous seas. (Note 3   "on the 15th day of September 1961, aboard USSCavalier(APA-37),Latitude 30 degree 28' N Longitude 131 degree 55' E, did pass directly through the eye of the TYPOON NANCY, accompanied by 160 knot winds, 65 foot seas, and a barometer reading of 27.32.  Taken from the Typhoon Eye Baller Card given to the crew. The storm however, did little serious  damage.”)  The CAVALIER returned to the United States on 12 December 1961.


FEB 1962 – “MOST DECORATED SHIP”

On  7  February  1962, Captain H. M.  Easterling,  USN,  relieved  Captain  G.  L. Cameron, USN, as Commanding Officer  of  the  USS  CAVALIER. This  terminated  a well-deserved two months  upkeep  period  and  started  the CAVALIER on a new operation  schedule  appropriately  described as "busy".  The months of March and April were occupied  by  several  inspections and  CAVALIER's endeavors to  attain  the  Gold Engineering "E" and the Gold Assault Boat Award.  Grades  of
Excellent in each of these fields made possible the gold insignia  now  shown on the CAVALIER.  These plus the  Green  Communication  tocti with one hash mark gave foundation to Captain  Easterling's  statement
, "We are probably the most decorated amphibious ship in  the Navy today".


MAY 1962 SHIP REPAIR

May of 1962 saw the CAVALIER depart for San Francisco and a three  months yard period.  Extensive work was performed by Pacific Ship  Repair  Company assisted by the Ship's force in  all  departments  with  the most significant improvement  concerning  communication  gear.   Successful sea trial made possible CAVALIER's  return  to  San Diego on 6 August.

After  a short week in port the CAVALIER commenced four weeks  of  arduous  refresher training followed by two weeks  of  amphibious  training under the supervision of AOTU.


OCT 1962 WESTPAC

With  only  two  short weeks to ready the ship  for  WestPac  the  CAVALIER departed 16 October 1962 for another tour of duty  under  the SEVENTH Fleet.


The ship arrived in Sasebo, Japan on 28 November after several weeks at sea, interrupted by a pleasant two weeks period spent at  Pearl  Harbor.  CAVALIER became PHIBRON THREE flagship early  in  December with   Commodore V. M. Wildt shifting his flag from  the  USS  GEORGE  CLYMER (APA-27).  With the staff  aboard,  1962  was  concluded with several small amphibious operations, which took the  CAVALIER  to  Numazu,  Japan, Okinawa, and  Pohang,  Korea  where  training was conducted with Korean Marines for a week.

 


APR 1963 - SAN DIEGO

She  returned  to  San  Diego on 30 April  1963,  and  spent  the  remainder  of the year conducting battle problems and  amphibious  training  exercises  off the coast of California.  In  May  1963,  Captain R. L. Cochrane took command of the CAVALIER.